National Bat Monitoring Programme





National Bat Monitoring Programme
The BCT runs a number of national, annual surveys through a volunteer network to monitor the status of many of our bat species across a range of habitats. Our surveys form the National Bat Monitoring Programme through which we track changes in bat populations.  Monitoring bats is essential as it would seem that many of our bat species have declined dramatically over the last 60 years.
The data collected allows us to:
Assess the conservation needs of the UK’s 17 species of bat
Identify any rapid declines
Select conservation priorities and inform conservation policy
Ensure limited resources are directed to where they are most needed.
Since 1996 more than 2200 volunteers have taken part in our surveys at over 4000 roost or field sites around the UK. The data collected have already indicated population changes in some species but surveying needs to continue for many more years in order to ascertain whether these are long-term trends or simply short-term fluctuations.
Anyone can take part in our surveys. We run surveys aimed at beginners as well as experts. Without the valuable information collected by volunteers we would be unable to track how the UK’s bat species are faring.
National Bat Monitoring Programme volunteers are given access to our online bat sound library.
For instruction in how to use a bat detector and carry out our Field Survey, visit our online field survey tutorial.
How to take part

National Bat Monitoring Programme

The Bat Conservation Trust run a number of national, annual surveys through a volunteer network to monitor the status of many of our bat species across a range of habitats.


common pipistrelle

common pipistrelle

Surveys form the National Bat Monitoring Programme through which they can track changes in bat populations.


Monitoring bats is essential as it would seem that many of our bat species have declined dramatically over the last 60 years.



The BCT say:

“Since 1996 more than 2200 volunteers have taken part in surveys at over 4000 roost or field sites around the UK. The data collected has already indicated population changes in some species but surveying needs to continue for many more years in order to ascertain whether these are long-term trends or simply short-term fluctuations”.

How to take part

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